mindset Archives | Nick Deacon Fitness
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It’s been a long day, but you can finally kick back and put your feet up. The voice in your head tempts you to find a treat from the freezer or wine cabinet. Go ahead, you deserve it. Waiting to see the results of your hard work is excruciating. And in those moments of temptation, it can be easy to lose focus on the bigger goals ahead. Unfortunately we live in a society where is a reward and the focus of every special occasion. (Especially the super yummy kind that makes us overeat and ruins our health.) Happy birthday! Here’s a cake. Just married. Have some cake. A promotion! How would you like your steak? The truth is changing your body takes time, but a better reward system can help keep your fitness journey on track.   SHOULD You Reward Yourself?   Before we go any further, are rewards even a good idea? Some people don’t need rewards to keep going… Jessica Love - I don't reward myself. If I want something I buy it. The journey and experience or feeling of accomplishment is the "reward" for me. Ev A - I tell myself I am not a dog - I do not deserve a treat for being a good girl Shelly Gauvreau - The fact that I feel better is reward. Carolyn Slocum - “I love that I am 52 and can rock some booty shorts so that’s truly all the reward I need!” That’s cool for them, but what about Katie? Rewards help her stay disciplined. Katie Turner - … Maybe some people can get through on nothing but the idea of looking and feeling better, but listen, there are some days that knowing a mini vacation is on the line keeps me more disciplined than just thinking I might one day look good in a bikini. (And I don't think this means I need to reassess why I'm doing this...

…Adults Look Down and Behind? Isn’t it amazing how rapidly children grow? I don’t mean just physically, but developmentally. In only ten short years, they go from having no clue how to tie their shoes to building the robots that might do it for them (did your high school have a sick robotics team like mine?). They (hopefully) learn to stop being selfish toddlers and transform into gracious gift-giving volunteers. They go from clumsily tripping over themselves in a fit of tears to standing in the face of adversity to win championships in complex sports. They may learn how to cook, speak for themselves, travel independently, and work a grinder of a job to become a functioning part of society. And in just ten years, they do all of this simultaneously. What have I done in the last ten years? I’m sure there are a few things you’re proud of, but are they countless? Have you forgotten most of them because they’re as abundant as the lessons from ten years of childhood? The neighbor’s high school kids might have you beat… What differences exist between adults and children, and could we learn from them to apply strategies to improve our own lives? First Difference: Authority Figures Children are surrounded by potential coaches and mentors. Parents, teachers, friends, friends’ parents and siblings, their own older siblings, aunts, uncles, grandparents, sport/dance/music coaches, tutors, etc. Basically anyone older than them. The list is extensive! Children seem to always be accountable to someone else, someone higher than them. They always have a guiding light. How many adults maintain such relationships deep into their adult life? A special role in adult life is that of an employer, or more specifically, a boss. Unfortunately, I hear more about people hating their bosses than loving them and looking up to them. No longer wearing the student hat, many of the other potential mentor roles in children’s lives simply...

This week’s question comes from a dynamo doctor who refuses to let his life pass him by - from skiing double black diamonds and learning how to train like a wild animal, he embodies the need to conquer! Father Time be damned, he never uses his six decades of worldly experience as an excuse, and is interested in how to push even harder! What an inspiration! Q: How do I push harder without you [or another trainer/training partner] looking over my shoulder? A: Great question - This can be a difficult task, but it is a critical problem faced by many and is certainly worth solving. Remember, intensity in the gym is far more productive and conducive to producing real, lasting results than utilizing longer durations/volumes of a lesser intensity. Let’s break this topic down into a few steps. My first suggestion is to figure out why you’re even looking to be working harder. Nobody wants to work harder because it involves hard work. Hard work itself sucks. Yet, people out there choose to work hard every single day, so something has to be worth more than “the suck” of hard work. So how do you figure this out for yourself? Set aside some time to think about why you even go to the gym in the first place. What is it that you want to accomplish? Why is it important to you? Most importantly, make sure you identify what is the alternative to NOT pursuing and reaching your goals? If you honestly can’t find anything, perhaps you should re-evaluate your habit. Why continue to spend time and effort even going to the gym? I’m sure you have better things to do. I train because I love the process and the experience, even if it is usually challenging and even grueling at times. If I didn’t love training, I wouldn’t...